The Correspondents

THE CORRESPONDENTS at Clwb Ifor Bach Sat 23 November 2019 from 07:00 pm

The Correspondents


Biography
The Correspondents consist of a singer Mr Bruce and a producer Chucks. Both growing up in South London, they formed in 2007 and within two years had taken their hi-octane genre-blending dance music from house parties to festival main stages.

It’s hard to pin down exactly what they do. Mr Bruce dances in a tempestuous whirlwind of monochromatic energy while singing, rapping and scatting about the trails and tribulations of love, lust and everything in between. Chucks takes the crowd on a journey through genres from the retro sounds of the Swing Era to Blues and 60s Soul, and then out the other end into Electronica, Drum and Bass & Jungle. The Correspondents are never afraid to stick to their pop sensibilities, but get fidgety dwelling anywhere too long.

Since their inception they have toured far, wide and relentlessly bringing their unique live show to huge crowds, earning themselves Telegraph's ?Top Ten Glastonbury Highlights' two years in a row. The Times mentioned the band as ‘bundles of fun’ and the surprise success of Wilderness Festival 2017. 

Following on from their more introspective 2014 album release ‘Puppet Loosely Strung’ the Correspondents come out with their 2nd long player, ‘Foolishman’ in 2017. It rediscovers their energetic multi-genred approach. Older, wiser, better looking and less inclined to take themselves seriously, the sound they create is increasingly sophisticated and designed for the dance floor.

Aside from the music itself The Correspondents have become renowned for their videos that are consistently unique in style and pioneering in technique. 'Fear and Delight', by visionary film-maker Naren Wilks, has had over 1.5 million views on youtube and won awards from the VMA and Berlin Music awards. Singer Mr Bruce has animated several music videos himself, with Well Measured Vice reached the front page of Reddit with its artistic virtuosity.

Their Who Knew EP released at the end of 2018 sticks to their multi-genre credentials and whole heartedly embraces a pop sensibility to pull the listener in four very different directions with candour and finesse.

Whether it’s an earnest up tempo love ballad reminiscent of the Cure (Who Knew), an explosive electro funk track about humanity’s high speed demise (Apocalypse) or a choral lilt on identity politics, consumerism and The Me Too movement (Only One Not Smiling) this EP shows the band at the apex of their capabilities. And there are some pretty inventive and surreal videos in the pipeline alongside them.

Notes: 18+
      Qty  
FIRST RELEASE: £15.00  

Located on Womanby Street, a narrow alley located across the road from Cardiff Castle, Clwb Ifor Bach – you might find it referred to as ‘Y Clwb’, or merely ‘Clwb’, or ‘The Welsh Club’ if three easily-pronounced words of the native tongue is deemed a shade taxing – opened in 1983. It was initially a members’ club, one which sought to promote the Welsh language in Cardiff. While much of north and west Wales speaks Welsh as a primary language, Cardiff and the surrounding area is considered English-speaking first and foremost; this is reflected in the music that has emanated from the city over the decades, yet once Clwb Ifor Bach began to establish itself as a music venue, bands and artists from the breadth of Wales found their way through its doors.
The commercial ascendancy of a select few Welsh-speaking outfits in the mid-90s – Super Furry Animals, Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci and Catatonia made the greatest inroads – sparked, even if inadvertently, an upswing and a greater eclecticism in the venue’s booking schedule. Memorable evenings in this decade included, among a sprawling list, UK electronic icons Autechre, the first and only Welsh show by Pavement (an early success for promo company Xplosure, who had a weekly band night which ran for some years), a just-pre-superstardom sell-out gig for Coldplay and a slew of monstrous rave-ups by hip-hop and dance promoters. Hustler covered hip-hop, funk and breakbeat, Silent Running brought every drum’n’bass icon under the sun to Cardiff and Radius maintained high house and techno standards. Names scattered among Clwb’s backhistory include DJ Shadow, Roni Size, Scratch Perverts, 808 State, LTJ Bukem and Roots Manuva, to name a mere handful.
The rule on which the club was established – that membership, for which one was given a card, required an ability to speak Welsh or a commitment to learn – was relaxed in the late 90s. Staff members are generally expected to speak the mother tongue, though, and things such as gig posters in the venue are bilingual where possible. The broad ‘vibe’ of Clwb Ifor Bach, friendly and bereft of dress codes or pocket-vacuuming drinks prices, stayed much the same, as the 21st century found South Wales spawning a glut of new bands (and rappers, DJs etc). Reflected in events like Radio 1 Live In Cardiff (October 2000) and labels such as Boobytrap, Ifor Bach was more of an epicentre for loud activity than ever. A disarmingly warm show headlined by The Strokes, in the summer of 2001, was one especially destined to stick in the memory of those who snared a ticket.
It’s 2008, and Clwb Ifor Bach has driven its foundations further still into the earth. Promoters and club nights have come and gone (although some, have been extant for over a decade now), and so have other music venues. Live music has been on both the top and bottom floors since 2005; the capacity on the top floor has recently been increased, yet there are still plenty of sell-out shows. It’s not at all unknown for some proper famous boys to choose it for an ‘intimate’ gig on the down low – Super Furry Animals, Lost Prophets and Bullet For My Valentine are three recent examples. Notable shows in the last 12 months have come courtesy of Blood Red Shoes, Dead Meadow, Turisas, Foals, Black Lips, Future Of The Left, Los Campesinos!, The Cardiacs and Surgeon; prominent promoters at the time of writing include Forecast, Music Events Wales, Pedigree Falcon, Holodeck, Aperture, Sumo and Lesson No.1. Got designs to be among that list? Call up the venue. There’s always room for more of this sort of spirit.
Oh! What’s an Ifor Bach? It’s a who, not a what – Ifor Bach was the Welsh lord of the Cantref of Senghennydd, who in 1158 kidnapped the oppressive Earl of Gloucester and thus had hero status bestowed on him. He’s a symbol of sorts for those in Wales who don’t give in or take the easy route. Some people even named a music venue after him.

Address: 11 Womanby Street, Cardiff, CF10 1BR * Click on the address to launch google maps.